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Posted October 14th, 2014 in Bardstown, Blog by Rick Hill

The Kentucky Standard’s August 3, 2014 editorial on Bardstown’s sign ordinances and regulations failed to address the underlying problem: the confusing and often illegible document that governs sign regulation in Bardstown, Kentucky.

 

Simply put, our sign regulation system is broken. This is obvious from a cursory look into the sign ordinances and regulations available on the City of Bardstown and the Joint City County Planning Commission websites. The format of the sign regulation is totally disorganized. Its language is repetitive and vague. Even more embarrassing, the document is rife with poor grammar, incomplete statements and ambiguous terms. What “experts” put this regulation together in the first place and how has it survived in its current form for so many years? Anyone who believes the document provides clear communication and offers a reflection of our community’s standards has obviously not read it. Continue Reading »

Posted October 14th, 2014 in Bardstown, Blog by Rick Hill
Village People or Village Idiots?

Village People or Village Idiots?

You know it’s election season in Nelson County when you hear the chorus of political candidates singing Y-M-C-A. They pretend they represent the village people, but in actuality, they’re more like the village idiots.

 

Two comments made by candidates in recent debates especially stand out. First, a candidate mentioned that the county needs an indoor swim facility but argued that such a facility should not be part of a YMCA. Second, the same candidate suggested that a YMCA would compete with local fitness centers and argued that this is not something the county should encourage.
These statements clearly indicate that there is a big difference between knowing how to spell YMCA and understanding that a state-of-the-art YMCA could do a lot of good for our area.

 

We need a far more encompassing plan for community-wide health than a pool in a metal shed. And we’re not going to achieve communal fitness goals in a strip-mall fitness center with a dozen spinning machines. Have candidates even stepped into a state-of-the-art YMCA facility, with its focus on health and nutrition and its family-centered recreation, physical conditioning, strength, and therapeutic activities? One must assume not: If they had more than a passing familiarity with the types of amenities the Y offers, they would have never made their uninformed statements. Continue Reading »