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iami, the third largest luxury market in the United States, was once one hundred percent controlled by the Whitman family, owners of the Bal Harbour Shops. For years, the 500,000 square-foot Bal Harbour Shops, located north of Miami Beach on Highway A1A near 5-star hotels and high-rise luxury condos, restricted its luxury retailers from opening second stores in the market.

 

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akeside Park is one of the oldest continuously operating amusement parks in the U.S. More than just a theme park, Lakeside is a symbol of gentler times, when amusement parks were cherished gardens of family entertainment and a place for safe risk-taking. Today, an informed exploration of Lakeside’s iconic concession stands, ticket booths and rides showcases Beaux Arts, Art Deco, and Mid-Century Modern architectural periods.

 

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nternet shopping, same day delivery and new channels of retail distribution requires the complete rethinking of shopping-center designs by architects, retailers, and developers.
 
Rick Hill in an article published in ARE magazine presents a case for a different way of thinking about shopping center design, one that challenges the very notion of a fixed brick-and-mortar place. He envisions something that is adaptable, varied, flexible, dynamic, and fluid—something that can accommodate a far more dynamic mix of shops.

 

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n an article written for Downtown Idea Exchange, Rick Hill writes about the “in-between” zones of downtowns. He describes the underbellies and backsides of downtowns: those areas characterized by acres of underutilized parcels and aging and often functionally obsolete buildings, as the most intriguing of all urban zones. He states: “Even in their tattered state these remnant zones of previous industrial, manufacturing, and segregation economies offer hope, promise and the greatest potential for economic development.”

 

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ocated in downtown Bardstown, Kentucky, North Third Street is more than a charming boulevard lined with irresistible shops. It is a quintessential main street experience and the center of 35 square-block national historic landmark district, called the “Most Beautiful Small Town in America” by USA Today. It is also Rick Hill’s hometown.

 

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